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SMELLING essential Oils of Rosemary adn Lavender help protect from free radicals

August 19, 2013

(NaturalNews) A breakthrough study on essential oils, led by Dr. Mahmoud A. Saleh, reveals an elaborate list of herbs that possess powerful antioxidant properties. Using high tech gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technology, Saleh was able to isolate a very powerful group of essential oils that exhibit strong free radical scavenging activity at concentrations of just 5mg /mL.

Natural News science also confirms that essential oils of rosemary and lavender reduce stress and stimulate free radical scavenging activity just by smelling them.

This means that just by sniffing lavender or rosemary, the body can increase its disease fighting potential tremendously, helping the body protect cells from free radical damage.

This is great news for the natural product industry, which typically uses essential oils to enliven their products. This is also good news for the future of food science. Essential oils are a disease prevention powerhouse and would be great replacements for food additives like artificial flavorings and chemical sweeteners.

Uncontrolled levels of free radicals destroy human cells
At the cellular level, the uncontrolled production of oxygen-derived free radicals is capable of oxidizing bio-molecules, eliciting cell death and tissue damage. Free radical damage shows up in people as inflammation, aging, and carcinogenesis.

Free radical damage is countered by the presence of antioxidant activity. Antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, polyphenols and glutathione are oxidative enzymes that protect against oxidative stress at the cellular level. When these antioxidant protectors are unbalanced, diseases can easily set in.

17 essential oils that exhibit the highest free radical scavenging activity
In his study, Dr. Saleh studied the antioxidant properties of 248 medicinal, herbal essential oils.
Saleh’s process began with adding .5 mL methanolic solution of each of oil to 2.0 mL of a .02 mM methanolic DPPH solution. Three final concentrations were studied: 100 mg, 25 mg and 5mg. The results revealed that 60 of the oils expressed high antioxidant levels at concentrations of 100 mg/mL. 27 of the oils were active at 25 mg/mL, and a very powerful group of 17 oils were active at 5 mg/mL These oils included common ones like basil, oregano, thyme, catnip, cinnamon leaf, and clove bud. Other powerful oils included blue tansy, vetiver, rose, chili pepper, allspice, wild bay, Buddha wood, laurel leaf, and Peru balsam. Saleh’s study emphasizes the importance of using essential oils in one’s daily life to help fight free radical damage.

Free radical scavenging activity obtained from breathing in lavender and rosemary

To prevent oxidative stress, the human body employs many antioxidant systems that scavenge free radicals. Human saliva itself exhibits this activity. In fact, changes in saliva cortisol levels can be observed by aromatherapy.

Natural News Science documents a publication involving 22 healthy volunteers who breathed in rosemary and lavender aroma for five minutes. After collecting the volunteer’s saliva samples, free radical scavenging activity was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl.

The results showed that free radical scavenging activity values increase by aroma-induced stimulation at low concentrations for lavender (1000 times dilution) and at high concentration for rosemary (10 times dilution) Both aromas decreased cortisol levels. No significant changes were observed in sIgA or alpha-amylase but the findings do reveal that both lavender and rosemary decrease the release of stress hormone cortisol and enhance free radical scavenging activity.

The natural product industry should be excited with these discoveries, as well as food scientists. Adding essential oils to foods and products is the future and will promote disease prevention in the years to come.

Sources for this article include:

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://www.ishib.org

http://stress.about.com

About the author:
Lance Johnson is avid learner of natural health, who’s creating an all natural products movement from the ground up at: http://www.allnaturalfreespirit.com As more hearts move toward natural solutions in a world of toxins and propaganda, Lance believes real health opportunities exist. Pick up a 100% Natural Armed Defense Deodorant or a few bars of Liberty Soap from the Free Spirit online store.

Lance and his wife are also passionate about nutrient utilization and detoxification at the cellular level. They love sharing their testimony and reaching out to those seeking positive lifestyle changes.

Contact Lance and Kender on their site for more empowering health information.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041674_free_radical_scavenging_essential_oils_lavender.html?utm_source=Praktikos+Institute+Updates&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=a597ecbb14-Today%27s+News+%28Campaign%29&utm_term=0_6e3529e57b-a597ecbb14-6102717#ixzz2cRW5bLiX

Great article about “superfoods”

August 16, 2013

SM: although I personally disagree that an all plant diet is right for everyone, This is a valuable article about the “superfood” nonsense that pervades the marketing world who is trying to convince you that there is something to be gained by buying THEIR foods/supplements etc.

“They’re all around us — goji berries, chia seeds, maca, pomegranates, and the list goes on. Certain individual foods are labeled “superfoods” by the food industry and so concentrated powders, extracts, oils, and juices of these foods are then marketed as beneficial because of their supposed special effects. The claims around these concentrated forms of certain foods include “improves vitality,” “wards off disease,” or even “boosts libido.” The modern shopper is hopelessly confused as he or she tries to match a host of products with a wide array of specific desired benefits. Even the person on a whole-food, plant-based diet may wonder, ”Should I be taking something to make sure I’m getting enough antioxidants?”

Where are things going awry? In spite of the fact that the word “superfood” is neither a technical nor scientific term, some of these claims about specific nutrients do have research supporting them. However, focusing on any single nutrient or class of nutrients outside the context of the whole, natural foods that contain them is a misplaced emphasis; the total dietary pattern is what most influences health outcomes, even if experimental evidence exists that a particular nutrient may have a given effect on the body. The preoccupation with concentrated food substances is really an extension of the preoccupation with the specific nutrients or nutrient classes.

Popular media defines a “superfood” as a food that contains unusually high amounts of specific nutrients, often antioxidants — substances that combat cell damage due to aging and other factors. It’s easy to fall into thinking that if some is good, more must be better. What we are forgetting here is that eating more of a nutrient doesn’t necessarily mean that our bodies will use it; absorption and utilization are largely determined by the body’s need at the time of consumption along with many other variables. Drinking pomegranate juice or blueberry extract may do no more than put a hole in our pockets, along with encouraging overconsumption of simple sugars without the fiber those sugars are naturally paired with in the fruit. And in some cases an excess can be every bit as problematic for health as a deficiency.

The example of antioxidants illustrates the misconception around “getting enough” of this class of nutrients. When we’re eating a colorful whole-food, plant-based diet, we don’t need to concern ourselves with antioxidant deficiency. It is when we eat a diet poor in fruits and vegetables (and therefore antioxidants) that we need to worry about getting enough of them. Processed foods contain few antioxidants, because they are stripped during processing. And the antioxidants present in animal foods reside in the animal’s tissues only because it consumed plants during its lifetime. Why not eliminate the middleman and get the antioxidants directly?

When are plant-based “superfoods” good for us? When they are whole and part of a low-fat diet comprised of foods eaten fresh, as grown, then yes — absolutely! A diet that includes potatoes, rice, beans, bananas, apples, spinach, kale, corn, cucumbers, kumquats, squash, quinoa, lettuce, tomatoes, sprouts, nuts, strawberries, and whatever else you want to throw on the plate is a great program! Eating colorful foods is beneficial, as long as they are whole foods and not extracts, powders, or concentrated individual nutrients. Eating for variety and color is a strategy that will deliver all the nutrients we need (with the possible exception of vitamin B12), as long as we are consuming adequate calories. We need not worry about whether or how we are getting enough of certain single nutrients or classes of nutrients. It might be easier to just call a whole-food, plant-based diet a “superdiet” and leave it at that.”

Micaela Karlsen, M.S.P.H.

Micaela Karlsen, M.S.P.H.

Micaela Karlsen, M.S.P.H received her master’s degree in human nutrition and public health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and has a BA in psychology from Cornell University. She formerly served as executive director of the T. Colin Campbell Foundation and is a contributor to the NYT bestseller Forks Over Knives: The Plant-Based Way to Health. Micaela maintains the informational website PlantBasedResearch.org.

Chamomile Effecteive for Anxiety and Depression

August 15, 2013

written by Case Adams, Naturopath

Recent clinical and laboratory research has determined that chamomile is not only relaxing, but it can significantly decrease anxiety and even fight depression.

The most recent study, from the UK’s University of Nottingham Medical School, found that chamomile significantly relaxed blood vessels and smooth muscle fibers. This effect was indicated specifically with the application of three of chamomile’s central constituents, apigenin, luteolin and bisabolol – all hydroxylates.

This effect of chamomile to soothe and calm the system was also showed in a recent study from the Eulji University Hospital in South Korea. Here 56 patients undergoing coronary treatment and surgery were given aromatherapy with a combination of lavender, chamomile and neroli. A control group was given only nursing care.

The researchers found that the aromatherapy group had significantly lower anxiety and improved sleep compared to the control group.

Focused clinical evidence proves Chamomile’s effectiveness
The fact that chamomile is an anti-anxiety and anti-depression herb was cemented by a clinical study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. This study was done in 2009, but its data and findings were re-investigated and confirmed last year.

The researchers enlisted 19 people diagnosed with anxiety with comorbid depression, along with 16 people who were diagnosed as having a history of anxiety and depression. These groups were studied along with a control group of 22 people who had no anxiety or depression – past or present.

The study was randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled. The researchers gave the subjects either 220 milligrams of chamomile extract (standardized to 1.2% apigenin) or a placebo study, both in capsules.

The treatment period spanned eight weeks. During the first week the subjects were given one capsule a day, and for those receiving less benefit on their anxiety scores, this was increased to two capsules the second week, three capsules the third week, four the fourth week and five for the remainder of the eight weeks.

The primary means for judging the success of the treatment was the Hamilton Anxiety Rating (HAM-A) scoring system – which utilizes questionnaires to determine ones level of anxiety. The researchers also used the Beck Anxiety Inventory system and the Psychological Well Being system, as well as the Clinical Global Impression Severity system to confirm their findings.

The researchers found that 57% of the group using the chamomile extract had significantly reduced (greater than 50%) anxiety scores using the HAM-A system.

Three years later, the University of Pennsylvania researchers undertook another review of the data in this study to determine whether or not treatment with chamomile for the clinically anxious and clinically depressed could be considered “clinically meaningful.” This of course enables medical peers to gauge whether or not chamomile could be used as a prescriptive treatment for diagnosed patients.

After reviewing the study and research data in depth, the researchers concluded that the results were “clinically meaningful” and they pointed out that,

“the research team observed a significantly greater reduction over time in total HAM-D scores for chamomile versus placebo in all participants.”

This of course means that the improvement in their HAM-D scores – taken only over an eight-week period – short for an herbal therapy – continued to increase over the period of the trial.

But what happens when Chamomile is used over longer periods?
The study not only confirms chamomile’s usefulness for anxiety and depression, but that its effects can increase over a longer duration. Traditional herbalists will typically recommend the use of anti-anxiety herbs such as chamomile, lavender, St. John’s wort and others over a period of three months to a year in order for them to reach their full effectiveness. After that, they are often recommended to be continued at least periodically or as needed.

The good news about chamomile, as evidenced by this and other studies, is that it has no known adverse side effects and is non-addictive. This is in stark contrast to anti-depressant pharmaceuticals, some of which are known for being significantly addictive in addition to having numerous other adverse effects.

REFERENCES:

Roberts RE, Allen S, Chang AP, Henderson H, Hobson GC, Karania B, Morgan KN, Pek AS, Raghvani K, Shee CY, Shikotra J, Street E, Abbas Z, Ellis K, Heer JK, Alexander SP. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2013 Jul 8.

Cho MY, Min ES, Hur MH, Lee MS. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:381381.

Amsterdam JD, Shults J, Soeller I, Mao JJ, Rockwell K, Newberg AB. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) may provide antidepressant activity in anxious, depressed humans: an exploratory study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):44-9.

Amsterdam JD, Li Y, Soeller I, Rockwell K, Mao JJ, Shults J. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral Matricaria recutita (chamomile) extract therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009 Aug;29(4):378-82.

caseadamsCase Adams is a California Naturopath and holds a Ph.D. in Natural Health Sciences. His focus is upon science-based natural health solutions. He is the author of 25 books on natural health and numerous print and internet articles. A listing and description of many of his books can be found on Realnatural.org. His new video series on low back pain can be found at Healthy-back.net. Case appreciates feedback and questions at case@caseadams.com.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

chamomile effective

August 15, 2013

Recent clinical and laboratory research has determined that chamomile is not only relaxing, but it can significantly decrease anxiety and even fight depression.

The most recent study, from the UK’s University of Nottingham Medical School, found that chamomile significantly relaxed blood vessels and smooth muscle fibers. This effect was indicated specifically with the application of three of chamomile’s central constituents, apigenin, luteolin and bisabolol – all hydroxylates.

This effect of chamomile to soothe and calm the system was also showed in a recent study from the Eulji University Hospital in South Korea. Here 56 patients undergoing coronary treatment and surgery were given aromatherapy with a combination of lavender, chamomile and neroli. A control group was given only nursing care.

The researchers found that the aromatherapy group had significantly lower anxiety and improved sleep compared to the control group.

Focused clinical evidence proves Chamomile’s effectiveness
The fact that chamomile is an anti-anxiety and anti-depression herb was cemented by a clinical study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. This study was done in 2009, but its data and findings were re-investigated and confirmed last year.

The researchers enlisted 19 people diagnosed with anxiety with comorbid depression, along with 16 people who were diagnosed as having a history of anxiety and depression. These groups were studied along with a control group of 22 people who had no anxiety or depression – past or present.

The study was randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled. The researchers gave the subjects either 220 milligrams of chamomile extract (standardized to 1.2% apigenin) or a placebo study, both in capsules.

The treatment period spanned eight weeks. During the first week the subjects were given one capsule a day, and for those receiving less benefit on their anxiety scores, this was increased to two capsules the second week, three capsules the third week, four the fourth week and five for the remainder of the eight weeks.

The primary means for judging the success of the treatment was the Hamilton Anxiety Rating (HAM-A) scoring system – which utilizes questionnaires to determine ones level of anxiety. The researchers also used the Beck Anxiety Inventory system and the Psychological Well Being system, as well as the Clinical Global Impression Severity system to confirm their findings.

The researchers found that 57% of the group using the chamomile extract had significantly reduced (greater than 50%) anxiety scores using the HAM-A system.

Three years later, the University of Pennsylvania researchers undertook another review of the data in this study to determine whether or not treatment with chamomile for the clinically anxious and clinically depressed could be considered “clinically meaningful.” This of course enables medical peers to gauge whether or not chamomile could be used as a prescriptive treatment for diagnosed patients.

After reviewing the study and research data in depth, the researchers concluded that the results were “clinically meaningful” and they pointed out that,

“the research team observed a significantly greater reduction over time in total HAM-D scores for chamomile versus placebo in all participants.”

This of course means that the improvement in their HAM-D scores – taken only over an eight-week period – short for an herbal therapy – continued to increase over the period of the trial.

But what happens when Chamomile is used over longer periods?
The study not only confirms chamomile’s usefulness for anxiety and depression, but that its effects can increase over a longer duration. Traditional herbalists will typically recommend the use of anti-anxiety herbs such as chamomile, lavender, St. John’s wort and others over a period of three months to a year in order for them to reach their full effectiveness. After that, they are often recommended to be continued at least periodically or as needed.

The good news about chamomile, as evidenced by this and other studies, is that it has no known adverse side effects and is non-addictive. This is in stark contrast to anti-depressant pharmaceuticals, some of which are known for being significantly addictive in addition to having numerous other adverse effects.

REFERENCES:

Roberts RE, Allen S, Chang AP, Henderson H, Hobson GC, Karania B, Morgan KN, Pek AS, Raghvani K, Shee CY, Shikotra J, Street E, Abbas Z, Ellis K, Heer JK, Alexander SP. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2013 Jul 8.

Cho MY, Min ES, Hur MH, Lee MS. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:381381.

Amsterdam JD, Shults J, Soeller I, Mao JJ, Rockwell K, Newberg AB. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) may provide antidepressant activity in anxious, depressed humans: an exploratory study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):44-9.

Amsterdam JD, Li Y, Soeller I, Rockwell K, Mao JJ, Shults J. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral Matricaria recutita (chamomile) extract therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009 Aug;29(4):378-82.

caseadamsCase Adams is a California Naturopath and holds a Ph.D. in Natural Health Sciences. His focus is upon science-based natural health solutions. He is the author of 25 books on natural health and numerous print and internet articles. A listing and description of many of his books can be found on Realnatural.org. His new video series on low back pain can be found at Healthy-back.net. Case appreciates feedback and questions at case@caseadams.com.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Watermelon Juice Relieves Post Workout Soreness

August 15, 2013

Watermelon Juice Relieves Post-Exercise Muscle Soreness

Date:15 August 2013

Type:Nutrition & Health News

Source:Nutrition Horizon

Sector:Fruits & Vegetables

15 Aug 2013 — Watermelon juice’s reputation among athletes is getting scientific support in a new study, which found that juice from the summer favorite fruit can relieve post-exercise muscle soreness.

The report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry attributes watermelon’s effects to the amino acid L-citrulline.

Encarna Aguayo and colleagues cite past research on watermelon juice’s antioxidant properties and its potential to increase muscle protein and enhance athletic performance. But scientists had yet to explore the effectiveness of watermelon juice drinks enriched in L-citrulline. Aguayo’s team set out to fill that gap in knowledge.

They tested natural watermelon juice, watermelon juice enriched in L-citrulline and a control drink containing no L-citrulline on volunteers an hour before exercise. Both the natural juice and the enriched juice relieved muscle soreness in the volunteers. L-citrulline in the natural juice (unpasteurized), however, seemed to be more bioavailable — in a form the body could better use, the study found.

How to remove skin tags NATURALLY

July 11, 2013

How To Remove Skin Tags Naturally with Food
Deborah Mitchell G+ July 8, 2013 – 8:22am for eMaxHealth

If you have skin tags, those annoying yet thankfully noncancerous pieces of tissue that can appear nearly anywhere on the body, you may have wondered how to get rid of them safely and naturally. Here are some ways to remove skin tags with food you may already have in your kitchen.
What are skin tags?
Skin tags, also known as acrochordons, cutaneous tags, fibroma mulloscum, and cutaneous papilloma, among other names, are benign skin tumors that often are attached to the body via a stalk (peduncle). They typically appear in areas where skin rubs against skin, such as the armpits, under the breasts, neck, eyelids, and groin.
Because skin tags commonly form in skin folds and creases, they generally appear more often among individuals who are overweight or obese. Pregnant women also are at greater risk for developing skin tags, and this may be associated with a change in hormone levels.
Skin tags are believed to be caused by an accumulation of collagen (a type of protein) and blood vessels inside thicker areas of skin. Nearly half of people in the United States have skin tags, according to the National Institutes of Health.
How to get rid of skin tags naturally
Before you try any of these methods, be sure the clump of skin you want to remove is truly a skin tag and not a mole or wart. A healthcare professional can answer that question for you.
Although skin tags can be removed quickly by a healthcare provider in the office, natural methods can take a week or longer, so you need to be patient. If you are ready, open up your kitchen cabinets and find a method that appeals to you.
Always gently clean and dry the skin tag before applying any of these methods. Skin tags that appear on the eyelid or near the eye are best handled by a medical professional.
• Apple cider vinegar. Use a cotton ball or soft cloth to apply apple cider vinegar to the skin tag 8 to 10 times a day. Rub gently in a circular motion. The tag should fall off in about 1 week.
• Baking soda and castor oil. Mix a small amount of castor oil with baking soda to make a paste. Apply the paste and cover with an adhesive bandage overnight. Clean the tag in the morning and repeat application of the paste every night for 8 to 10 days.
• Banana peel. Apply a small piece of banana peel, the inside of the peel against the skin tag, and cover with an adhesive bandage. Wear overnight. Remove during the day, and repeat every night until the skin tag falls off.
• Fruit juice. Use only fresh lemon, lime, or pineapple juice. Apply to the skin tag 2 to 4 times a day with a cotton ball. Do not rinse the juice off. The tag should fall off in about 7 to 10 days.
• Garlic. Apply minced garlic to the tag and cover with an adhesive bandage. Change the bandage three times a day. This approach may be offensive if you work in an office! To avoid skin irritation, you can mix a drop or two of vitamin E oil with the garlic.
• Ginger. Rub fresh ginger slices on the skin tag for several minutes 8 to 10 times a day. The skin tag should fall off within 2 weeks.
Skin tags can be a nuisance if clothing or jewelry rub against them and cause irritation. If you want to remove skin tags naturally, you might consider some of the natural methods using food discussed here.

13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil

June 19, 2013

13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil
Posted on: Green med
Monday, September 3rd 2012
Written By:
Sayer Ji, Founder

While coconut oil has dragged itself out of the muck of vast misrepresentation over the past few years, it still rarely gets the appreciation it truly deserves. Not just a “good” saturated fat, coconut oil is an exceptional healing agent as well, with loads of useful health applications.
Some examples of “good” saturated fat include
• Fat-burning: Ironic, isn’t it? A saturated fat which can accelerate the loss of midsection fat (the most dangerous kind). Well, there are now two solid, human studies showing just two tablespoons a day (30 ml), in both men and women, is capable of reducing belly fat within 1-3 months.
• Brain-Boosting: A now famous study, published in 2006 in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, showed that the administration of medium chain triglycerides (most plentifully found in coconut oil) in 20 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment, resulted in significant increases in ketone bodies (within only 90 minutes after treatment) associated with measurable cognitive improvement in those with less severe cognitive dysfunction.[i]
• Clearing Head Lice: When combined with anise spray, coconut oil was found to be superior to the insecticide permethrin (.43%).[ii]
• Healing Wounds: Coconut has been used for wound healing since time immemorial. Three of the identified mechanisms behind these healing effects are its ability to accelerate re-epithelialization, improve antioxidant enzyme activity, and stimulate higher collagen cross-linking within the tissue being repaired.[iii] Coconut oil has even been shown to work synergistically with traditional treatments, such as silver sulphadizine, to speed burn wound recovery.[iv]
• NSAID Alternative: Coconut oil has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic and fever-reducing properties.[v]
• Anti-Ulcer Activity: Interestingly, coconut milk (which includes coconut oil components), has been shown to be as effective as the conventional drug sucralfate as an NSAID-associated anti-ulcer agent.[vi]
• Anti-Fungal: In 2004, 52 isolates of Candida species were exposed to coconut oil. The most notorious form, Candida albicans, was found to have the highest susceptibility. Researchers remarked: “Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species.”[vii]
• Testosterone-Booster: Coconut oil was found to reduce oxidative stress in the testes of rats, resulting in significantly higher levels of testosterone.[viii]
• Reducing Swollen Prostate: Coconut oil has been found to reduce testosterone-induced benign prostate growth in rats.[ix]
• Improving Blood Lipids: Coconut oil consistently improves the LDL:HDL ratio in the blood of those who consume it. Given this effect, coconut oil can nolonger be dismissed for being ‘that saturated fat which clogs the arteries.’
• Fat-Soluble Nutrient Absorption: Coconut oil was recently found to be superior to safflower oil in enhancing tomato carotenoid absorption.[x]
• Bone Health: Coconut oil has been shown to reduce oxidative stress within the bone, which may prevent structural damage in osteoporotic bone.[xi] [Note: Osteoporosis is a Myth, as presently defined by the T-Score]
• Sunscreen: Coconut oil has been shown to block out UV rays by 30%. Keep in mind that this is good, insofar as UVA rays are damaging to the skin, whereas UVB rays are highly beneficial (when exposure is moderate).[i] Make sure to check this list of other sun-blocking oils.
Of course, when speaking about coconut oil, we are only looking at one part of the amazing coconut palm. Each component, including coconut hull fiber, coconut protein and coconut water has experimentally confirmed therapeutic applications.
________________________________________
References
• [i] Mark A Reger, Samuel T Henderson, Cathy Hale, Brenna Cholerton, Laura D Baker, G S Watson, Karen Hyde, Darla Chapman, Suzanne Craft . Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2004 Mar;25(3):311-4. PMID: 15123336
• [ii] Ian F Burgess, Elizabeth R Brunton, Nazma A Burgess . Clinical trial showing superiority of a coconut and anise spray over permethrin 0.43% lotion for head louse infestation, ISRCTN96469780. Eur J Pediatr. 2010 Jan ;169(1):55-62. Epub 2009 Apr 3. PMID: 19343362
• [iii] K G Nevin, T Rajamohan . Effect of topical application of virgin coconut oil on skin components and antioxidant status during dermal wound healing in young rats. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2010 ;23(6):290-7. Epub 2010 Jun 3. PMID: 20523108
• [iv] Pallavi Srivastava, S Durgaprasad. Burn wound healing property of Cocos nucifera: An appraisal. Indian J Pharmacol. 2008 Aug;40(4):144-6. PMID: 20040946
• [v] S Intahphuak, P Khonsung, A Panthong. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil. Pharm Biol. 2010 Feb;48(2):151-7. PMID: 20645831
• [vi] R O Nneli, O A Woyike. Antiulcerogenic effects of coconut (Cocos nucifera) extract in rats. Phytother Res. 2008 Jul;22(7):970-2. PMID: 18521965
• [vii] D O Ogbolu, A A Oni, O A Daini, A P Oloko. In vitro antimicrobial properties of coconut oil on Candida species in Ibadan, Nigeria. J Med Food. 2007 Jun;10(2):384-7. PMID: 17651080
• [viii] Graciela E Hurtado de Catalfo, María J T de Alaniz, Carlos A Marra. Dietary lipids modify redox homeostasis and steroidogenic status in rat testis. Phytother Res. 2010 Feb;24(2):163-8. PMID: 18549927
• [ix] María de Lourdes Arruzazabala, Vivian Molina, Rosa Más, Daisy Carbajal, David Marrero, Víctor González, Eduardo Rodríguez. Effects of coconut oil on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2007 Jul;59(7):995-9. PMID: 17637195
• [x] Lauren E Conlon, Ryan D King, Nancy E Moran, John W Erdman. Coconut Oil Enhances Tomato Carotenoid Tissue Accumulation Compared to Safflower Oil in the Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Aug 7. Epub 2012 Aug 7. PMID: 22866697
• [xi] Mouna Abdelrahman Abujazia, Norliza Muhammad, Ahmad Nazrun Shuid, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman. The Effects of Virgin Coconut Oil on Bone Oxidative Status in Ovariectomised Rat. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012 ;2012:525079. Epub 2012 Aug 15. PMID: 22927879

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